Abbie Schrotenboer

Associate Professor of Biology

Education

Ph.D., Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 2011
B.S., Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2003

Associated Academic Programs

Biology

“I want students to come away with an appreciation of the diversity of life on earth and the incredibly complex workings of ecological systems. So many things in God’s creation can cause one to just sit back and marvel at what we can find in this world.”

For Dr. Abbie Schrotenboer, a guiding theme for her classes is exploring God’s creation together. “As we learn more about the world around us, from cells to animals to ecosystems, we have a greater appreciation for God’s creative power and sustaining work in creation, and we also can be more informed about how we interact with creation.”

Schrotenboer has always loved exploring the outdoors, and she realized how important it is to protect and care for the natural world early on. “As both my faith and interest in science developed, I realized that not only is caring for the earth important for the health and well-being of people, animals, and plants, but it is also a part of our calling to be good stewards of God’s creation.”

What drew her to Trinity:

Schrotenboer was drawn to Trinity by the opportunity to share her enthusiasm for studying God’s amazing creation with others. “To be able to praise God together with students as we look at the workings of an ecosystem or the intricacies of a mutualism is a great privilege.”

Research interests:

God has called us to be stewards of the amazing creation he has provided for us. “Broadly speaking, my research focuses on better understanding His creation and the ways that humans interact with the creation,” said Schrotenboer. “In my own work, much of this is at a very local scale. This has value for making management decisions here on campus and in the Chicago area, but it also helps the larger academic field engage with issues of the connection between humans and nature, especially in a suburban/urban context.”

Additional research interests include:

  • Urban waterways: Water quality and biological diversity
  • Suburban wildlife diversity and habitat use, with a focus on coyote behavior
  • Extent and repercussions of ash tree death due to emerald ash borer
  • Ecological restoration and plant species diversity
  • Landcover change and its effects on local natural areas

When she’s not teaching:

Schrotenboer enjoys hiking the trails of our local forest preserves, birdwatching, and visiting the Morton Arboretum with her family. “I also appreciate time spent with family and friends, whether it be around the dinner table, at work on a puzzle, or at a church gathering.”

Schrotenboer maintains a blog here.

Courses

Ecology
Conservation Biology
Survey of Plants and Animals

Environmental Science
Introduction to Biological Science

Papers Published and/or Presented

Schrotenboer, A. (2015) Is climate engineering good creation care? Think Christian. http://thinkchristian.reframemedia.com/is-climate-engineering-good-creation-care

Werling, B. P., Dickson, T. L., Isaacs, R., Gaines, H., Gratton, C., Gross, K.L, Liere, H., Malmstrom, C., Meehan, T., Ruan, L., Robertson, B.A., Robertson, G.P., Schmidt, T., Schrotenboer, A., Teal, T., Wilson, J, and Landis, D.A. (2014). Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(4), 1652–7.

Schrotenboer, A.C., Allen M.S. & Malmstrom C.M. (2011) Modification of native grasses for biofuel production may increase virus susceptibility. Global Change Biology Bioenergy, 3, 360-375.

+ Expertise

For Dr. Abbie Schrotenboer, a guiding theme for her classes is exploring God’s creation together. “As we learn more about the world around us, from cells to animals to ecosystems, we have a greater appreciation for God’s creative power and sustaining work in creation, and we also can be more informed about how we interact with creation.”

Schrotenboer has always loved exploring the outdoors, and she realized how important it is to protect and care for the natural world early on. “As both my faith and interest in science developed, I realized that not only is caring for the earth important for the health and well-being of people, animals, and plants, but it is also a part of our calling to be good stewards of God’s creation.”

What drew her to Trinity:

Schrotenboer was drawn to Trinity by the opportunity to share her enthusiasm for studying God’s amazing creation with others. “To be able to praise God together with students as we look at the workings of an ecosystem or the intricacies of a mutualism is a great privilege.”

Research interests:

God has called us to be stewards of the amazing creation he has provided for us. “Broadly speaking, my research focuses on better understanding His creation and the ways that humans interact with the creation,” said Schrotenboer. “In my own work, much of this is at a very local scale. This has value for making management decisions here on campus and in the Chicago area, but it also helps the larger academic field engage with issues of the connection between humans and nature, especially in a suburban/urban context.”

Additional research interests include:

  • Urban waterways: Water quality and biological diversity
  • Suburban wildlife diversity and habitat use, with a focus on coyote behavior
  • Extent and repercussions of ash tree death due to emerald ash borer
  • Ecological restoration and plant species diversity
  • Landcover change and its effects on local natural areas

When she’s not teaching:

Schrotenboer enjoys hiking the trails of our local forest preserves, birdwatching, and visiting the Morton Arboretum with her family. “I also appreciate time spent with family and friends, whether it be around the dinner table, at work on a puzzle, or at a church gathering.”

+ Courses, Publications & Research

Schrotenboer maintains a blog here.

Courses

Ecology
Conservation Biology
Survey of Plants and Animals

Environmental Science
Introduction to Biological Science

Papers Published and/or Presented

Schrotenboer, A. (2015) Is climate engineering good creation care? Think Christian. http://thinkchristian.reframemedia.com/is-climate-engineering-good-creation-care

Werling, B. P., Dickson, T. L., Isaacs, R., Gaines, H., Gratton, C., Gross, K.L, Liere, H., Malmstrom, C., Meehan, T., Ruan, L., Robertson, B.A., Robertson, G.P., Schmidt, T., Schrotenboer, A., Teal, T., Wilson, J, and Landis, D.A. (2014). Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(4), 1652–7.

Schrotenboer, A.C., Allen M.S. & Malmstrom C.M. (2011) Modification of native grasses for biofuel production may increase virus susceptibility. Global Change Biology Bioenergy, 3, 360-375.