The SALT
Program

Senior Learning Programs

Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity

SALT, or Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity, offers a wide variety of educational classes, local trips, book discussions, breakfast speakers, and travel (U.S. & overseas) for those in the community 55 and over. The mission of the SALT program is to stimulate learning and discussion that will enrich lives, foster relationships, and strengthen the varied communities in which we live.

Membership Perks Include

  • Limited access to Trinity’s fitness center
  • Free on-campus parking sticker
  • Discount to theater performances and special invitations to director discussions
  • Tour of Art and Communication Center prior to Artist Lectures in the Seerveld Gallery
  • Invitation to campus lectures and special discussions following the lectures
  • Invitation to music department recitals and concerts
  • Free admission to regular-season home athletic contests
  • Invitation to campus Chapel services
  • Free WiFi while on campus
  • Listener passes to traditional classes, beginning in the Spring semester

Costs

The annual individual membership fee is $35; membership is required before registering for any classes. (But registering for membership and classes may be done at the same time.)

One-session classes are $15 per course, two-session classes are $30 per course, and three-session classes are $40 per course.

Available Courses

Wednesday, April 25, 9:00 am-3:00 pm
Roger Wiers, history educator

Take a walk back into the late nineteenth  century as we walk down Prairie Avenue.Kimball, Field, Pullman, Armour were just a few of the names of Chicago’s upper-class that lived on Prairie Avenue. We will tour the Glessner House and take a brief walk down Prairie. We will conclude the tour by visiting
Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago and its Tiffany windows.

On April 25, 9:00am van leaves campus. Return to campus by 3:00pm. Transportation will be available on a limited basis. Lunch and the tour cost are included in the $25 fee. Deadline for sign-up is April 9.

Monday, May 21, 3:00-4:45 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Dr. David Brodnax, professor of history

This book tells the story of how millions of African Americans left the South for northern and western cities between the 1910s  and 1970s. It won the National Book Critics  Circle Award, the New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and other prizes.

Monday, April 16 and Wednesday April 18, 8:00-9:15 am
DeVos Center Room 106
Shari Jurgens, physical education professor

We will discuss physical activity and conditioning for the seasoned adult. We are all aging and must recognize the importance of recreation and movement, especially how important it is to our long-term health, but also to our short-term enjoyment of life. Our goal is to facilitate learning about stretching, strengthening and nutrition before being physically active, along with talking about some myths and truths of movement for the seasoned adult. Our emphasis throughout the two morning sessions will be to prepare you to live a more productive life through movement. We will be incorporating some lecture, some interactions, and some movement activities in this class.

Tuesdays, May 15 & 22, 1-2:15 pm
Heritage Science Center Conference Room 200
Dr. Bethany Kelley-Jonker, communication arts professor

Media play a vital role in our daily lives from informing our world views to allowing usto share our family  stories. This two-session course will explore how the technology and economics of digital and social  media have changed the media landscape in the last 20 years (and what’s stayed the same).

Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16, 10:00-11:15 am
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Jim Kwasteniet, history of Chicago educator
Roger Wiers, history educator

After the devastation of the Chicago Fire in 1871, the city began a tremendous rebound. Chicago became  the fastest growing city in the world, demonstrating both the promise and the problems of urban life. The  World’s Fair of 1893 and the development of the Pullman community highlight both those problems and  promises of life in the city. We will examine the history of the Fair and of Pullman. The third session of the  class will be extended as we will visit the site of the Fair in Jackson Park and stop in the Pullman community. Transportation will be offered.

Mondays, May 7, 14, 21, 10:00-11:15 am
Classroom Building 215
Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

The 1930s and 1940s were dominated by economic depression and global conflict and were devastated by  dictators who followed extreme ideologies. In these decades, Winston Churchill and George Orwell courageously stood against dictatorship and sought to mobilize the people for freedom. We will discuss passages from Churchill’s memoirs and speeches and Orwell’s novels and essays to discover their commitmentsto resist tyranny and seek liberty. I got the idea for this class from Thomas Rick’s recent book, Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom. I will refer to this book as we interpret the life and work of Churchill and Orwell (but participants will not have to read the book).

Thursdays, May 3, 10, 17, 3:30 am-4:45 pm
HSC room 104
Dr. Lou Sytsma, professor emeritus of chemistry

It’s hard to think of a word in the Bible that is mentioned more and meant more to life than water.  Together with air, they are the most important physical blessings we can’t live without. Too often we take our water for granted and when we turn on the tap, we rarely think about where it comes from or the treatment it receives once we use it. Shortages of clean, fresh water in one area, floods in another area, and pollutants that can lead to illnesses are all of concern somewhere in the world. We’ll look at how these systems have evolved over the centuries, the technology used to deal with them now, and what we
might expect in the future.

Tuesdays, May 8, 15, 22 10:00-11:15 am
Heritage Science Center Conference
Room 200
Dr. Daniel Diephouse, professor emeritus of English

From the Chicagoan Carl Sandberg to the Creek Jo Harjo, from slam poetry to the spirituals, from  Langston Hughes and James Weldon Johnson to Kevin Coval to Louise Erdrich and Mary Tall Mountain, this class examines a part of the literary tapestry of the richly diverse American culture. Readings, commentary, and conversation help fill out this tapestry. During session one we’ll look at Urban Poetry, Chicago Style. For session two we’ll read Black American History: Poetic Voices. And in session three we’ll engage in Native American Culture: Poetic Voices.

Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16, 3:30-4:45 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Tom Panush, retired county sheriff

This class will cover all news fit to print, read, or discuss—local, national, and international. Tom’s classes are always buzzing with high spirited discussions. You are invited to join the lively intellectual debate or sit back and enjoy the good-humored exchange. As a retired public servant, Tom has an insider’s
view that is sure to broaden your horizons and your smile.

Thursdays, May 10, 17, 24, 2:00-3:15 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building

Session One: Lee Campbell and Jean LaRoche, retirement services professionals
Session Two: Emily Smith, professional organizer
Session Three: Jack Mudde, financial advisor

For many, as we age circumstances change and the house we had when we were raising a family is no  longer needed. Retirement brings new options and planning. This class will invite consideration and conversation.

In the first session we’ll look at options, opportunities, and alternatives when we’re thinking about  moving out of the family home. The second session will be led by a professional organizer who will help us simplify and organize a  downsized life. And the third session will be led by a financial planner who will help us consider the financial cost to the changes we may hope for and options that need consideration to avoid pitfalls.

+ One Session Offerings

Wednesday, April 25, 9:00 am-3:00 pm
Roger Wiers, history educator

Take a walk back into the late nineteenth  century as we walk down Prairie Avenue.Kimball, Field, Pullman, Armour were just a few of the names of Chicago’s upper-class that lived on Prairie Avenue. We will tour the Glessner House and take a brief walk down Prairie. We will conclude the tour by visiting
Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago and its Tiffany windows.

On April 25, 9:00am van leaves campus. Return to campus by 3:00pm. Transportation will be available on a limited basis. Lunch and the tour cost are included in the $25 fee. Deadline for sign-up is April 9.

Monday, May 21, 3:00-4:45 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Dr. David Brodnax, professor of history

This book tells the story of how millions of African Americans left the South for northern and western cities between the 1910s  and 1970s. It won the National Book Critics  Circle Award, the New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and other prizes.

+ Two Session Offerings

Monday, April 16 and Wednesday April 18, 8:00-9:15 am
DeVos Center Room 106
Shari Jurgens, physical education professor

We will discuss physical activity and conditioning for the seasoned adult. We are all aging and must recognize the importance of recreation and movement, especially how important it is to our long-term health, but also to our short-term enjoyment of life. Our goal is to facilitate learning about stretching, strengthening and nutrition before being physically active, along with talking about some myths and truths of movement for the seasoned adult. Our emphasis throughout the two morning sessions will be to prepare you to live a more productive life through movement. We will be incorporating some lecture, some interactions, and some movement activities in this class.

Tuesdays, May 15 & 22, 1-2:15 pm
Heritage Science Center Conference Room 200
Dr. Bethany Kelley-Jonker, communication arts professor

Media play a vital role in our daily lives from informing our world views to allowing usto share our family  stories. This two-session course will explore how the technology and economics of digital and social  media have changed the media landscape in the last 20 years (and what’s stayed the same).

+ Three Session Offerings

Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16, 10:00-11:15 am
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Jim Kwasteniet, history of Chicago educator
Roger Wiers, history educator

After the devastation of the Chicago Fire in 1871, the city began a tremendous rebound. Chicago became  the fastest growing city in the world, demonstrating both the promise and the problems of urban life. The  World’s Fair of 1893 and the development of the Pullman community highlight both those problems and  promises of life in the city. We will examine the history of the Fair and of Pullman. The third session of the  class will be extended as we will visit the site of the Fair in Jackson Park and stop in the Pullman community. Transportation will be offered.

Mondays, May 7, 14, 21, 10:00-11:15 am
Classroom Building 215
Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

The 1930s and 1940s were dominated by economic depression and global conflict and were devastated by  dictators who followed extreme ideologies. In these decades, Winston Churchill and George Orwell courageously stood against dictatorship and sought to mobilize the people for freedom. We will discuss passages from Churchill’s memoirs and speeches and Orwell’s novels and essays to discover their commitmentsto resist tyranny and seek liberty. I got the idea for this class from Thomas Rick’s recent book, Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom. I will refer to this book as we interpret the life and work of Churchill and Orwell (but participants will not have to read the book).

Thursdays, May 3, 10, 17, 3:30 am-4:45 pm
HSC room 104
Dr. Lou Sytsma, professor emeritus of chemistry

It’s hard to think of a word in the Bible that is mentioned more and meant more to life than water.  Together with air, they are the most important physical blessings we can’t live without. Too often we take our water for granted and when we turn on the tap, we rarely think about where it comes from or the treatment it receives once we use it. Shortages of clean, fresh water in one area, floods in another area, and pollutants that can lead to illnesses are all of concern somewhere in the world. We’ll look at how these systems have evolved over the centuries, the technology used to deal with them now, and what we
might expect in the future.

Tuesdays, May 8, 15, 22 10:00-11:15 am
Heritage Science Center Conference
Room 200
Dr. Daniel Diephouse, professor emeritus of English

From the Chicagoan Carl Sandberg to the Creek Jo Harjo, from slam poetry to the spirituals, from  Langston Hughes and James Weldon Johnson to Kevin Coval to Louise Erdrich and Mary Tall Mountain, this class examines a part of the literary tapestry of the richly diverse American culture. Readings, commentary, and conversation help fill out this tapestry. During session one we’ll look at Urban Poetry, Chicago Style. For session two we’ll read Black American History: Poetic Voices. And in session three we’ll engage in Native American Culture: Poetic Voices.

Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16, 3:30-4:45 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Tom Panush, retired county sheriff

This class will cover all news fit to print, read, or discuss—local, national, and international. Tom’s classes are always buzzing with high spirited discussions. You are invited to join the lively intellectual debate or sit back and enjoy the good-humored exchange. As a retired public servant, Tom has an insider’s
view that is sure to broaden your horizons and your smile.

Thursdays, May 10, 17, 24, 2:00-3:15 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building

Session One: Lee Campbell and Jean LaRoche, retirement services professionals
Session Two: Emily Smith, professional organizer
Session Three: Jack Mudde, financial advisor

For many, as we age circumstances change and the house we had when we were raising a family is no  longer needed. Retirement brings new options and planning. This class will invite consideration and conversation.

In the first session we’ll look at options, opportunities, and alternatives when we’re thinking about  moving out of the family home. The second session will be led by a professional organizer who will help us simplify and organize a  downsized life. And the third session will be led by a financial planner who will help us consider the financial cost to the changes we may hope for and options that need consideration to avoid pitfalls.

Seasoned Adults

Ginny Carpenter

Director of Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity