The SALT
Program

Senior Learning Programs

Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity

SALT, or Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity, offers a wide variety of educational classes, local trips, book discussions, breakfast speakers, and travel (U.S. & overseas) for those in the community 55 and over. The mission of the SALT program is to stimulate learning and discussion that will enrich lives, foster relationships, and strengthen the varied communities in which we live.   Read our brochure for full details.

Membership Perks Include

  • Invitation to take SALT classes (when you take 3 classes, the 4th is free!)
  • Free “listener pass” classes in Trinity’s traditional program in both the fall and spring semesters
  • Limited access to Trinity’s Fitness Center
  • Free on-campus parking sticker (no need to replace if one has already been issued to you)
  • Invitation to special theater performances and lectures
  • Invitation to music department recitals and concerts
  • Free admission to regular-season home athletic contests
  • Free WiFi while on campus
  • Significant discount rate for Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra (IPO) performances on campus.  Purchase tickets online here.

Costs

The annual individual membership fee is $35; membership is required before registering for any classes. (But registering for membership and classes may be done at the same time.)

One-session classes are $15 per course, two-session classes are $30 per course, and three-session classes are $40 per course.

Available Courses

Wednesday, October 9, 9 am-3 pm.
Depart from the Ozinga Chapel at 9am.
Jim Kwasteniet, history of Chicago educator

Join us as we walk the streets of downtown Chicago observing the  amazing architecture of the city and learning about the history of those magnificent buildings. See some of the very first “skyscrapers” of the late 19th century and many buildings that are on the National Registry of Historic Buildings. This is a walking tour covering approximately 2-3 miles. We will take frequent breaks. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and bring money for lunch. Transportation and our tour costs are covered in the $25 fee. Registration is required by September 20.

Thursday, October 24 from 3-4:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Jeff Hoelzel, attorney at law

Understanding how financial matters impact you from day-to-day can make a big difference in your life. The goal of Financial Literacy 101 is to enhance your understanding of financial concepts and
services so that you can make good and informed decisions with  your financial resources. We will learn about budgeting, saving, debt management and planning for retirement. Basic principles of investing will also be explained. The tools we explore will enable you to take control of your own financial education and prevent  inancial problems before they start. Registration is required by September 30.

Tuesday, October 22, 10-11:15 am.
Heritage Science Center, Room 200
Dr. Kyle Dieleman, professor of history

In light of Western society’s continued struggles with race, equality, and dehumanization of all sorts, Douglass’ account of his journey to freedom provides insights into the past that shine a light on the human situation. Join our group discussion of Douglass’  Narrative to better understand the struggles of American slaves in the nineteenth century and the brutality of slavery itself. We will also discuss how slavery was a dehumanizing institution for all  involved while also finding glimmers of hope and grace even in desperate situations. Registration is required by September 30.

Thursday, November 7, 2-3:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Dr. Ken Schoon, professor emeritus of science education

This fully-illustrated presentation will explore today’s Indiana Dunes. Discover the rugged beauty  of this remarkable landscape, their ecological importance, and the controversies, struggles, battles,  and scams that make up their unique history. Registration is required by September 30.

Tuesdays, October 1, 8, 15, 4-5 pm.
Ozinga Chapel Grand Lobby
Dr. Mary Lynn Colosimo, professor emeritus of psychology

Join us as we explore the 7 attitudinal foundations of mindfulness practice including non-judging, patience, beginner’s mind, trust, non-striving, acceptance, and letting go. This course involves reading,
journal writing, exercises, yoga, music and discussion. Please bring a yoga mat and dress comfortably. All yoga will be gentle. Registration is required by September 20.

Thursdays, October 3, 10, 17, 2-3:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

Reading historical novels is a great way to learn history. But how do these novels shape our view of history and deal with societies that are deeply divided and that even confront revolution? In this class we will  examine three European countries in three different eras through historical novels. We will focus on late eighteenth-century Britain through Winston Graham’s Poldark series, nineteenth-century France through Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables, and early twentieth-century Russia through Mikhail Sholokhov’s And Quiet Flows the Don. You need not read any of these novels to participate in and enjoy the class. (I will suggest that you might like to watch the Poldark series through several seasons on PBS and, more recently, PBS’s presentation on Les Miserables.) Registration is required by September 20.

Mondays, October 7, 14, 21, 4-5:15 pm.
Classroom Building, Room 212
Christian Altena, history educator

The great moments and movements of American history have always had a soundtrack. Songs have helped motivate us in times of war, lift our spirits in times of crisis and spur us to action to fight injustice. Popular music gives us a unique window to the past, showing us the attitudes, arguments and passions of common people in uncommon circumstances. Over the course of the class we will listen and sing our way through
American history from the Colonial era to the present. Registration is required by September 20.

Tuesdays, October 8, 15, 22, 1-2:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Emily Bosscher, Director of First Year Experience

George Orwell said, “Every generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.” Currently in the United States, there are 6 named  generations, and the generation currently in high school and college is the largest, most influential,
and perhaps most mystifying generation at this time. We will take an in-depth look at who and what this generation is, how they got this way, and how we can relate to and understand them best. This course is
especially pertinent, perhaps, for those with grandchildren between the ages of 10-24, but also relevant to anyone interested in social psychology, education, and culture! Registration is required by September 20.

Mondays, October 14, 21, 28, 2-3:15 pm.
Classroom Building, Room 211
Cleo Lampos, storyteller

This mini-series introduces three distinct groups of people from the 1930s who defied the desperation of  the time and created a legacy. The first groups, the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) and WPA (Works Progress Administration) in Illinois employed thousands of young men to build and reshape this great  state. Many of their projects are still in use. We will explore an eye-opening account of the art mural projects in Chicago that were saved by a special education teacher. A second group of legacy makers that  will be introduced are three athletes of the 1963 Berlin Olympics who demonstrated the relationship
between deprivation and success. Faith played an important component in these three individuals’ lives.  the third, and final, legacy makers we will explore are the Pack Horse Librarians who rode into the hollers of Kentucky to bring literacy to  isolated families. We will also highlight the bookmobiles utilized in this time frame. This mini-series brings honor to thousands of people who pressed through tough times with strong inner faith. Registration is required by September 20.

Wednesdays, October 16, 23, 30, 2-3:15 pm.
Classroom Building, Room 202
Dr. Dennis Connelly, professor of criminal justice

Fifty years later, come take an in-depth look into one of America’s most infamous crimes—the murders committed by the Charles Manson family. This class will view the original 1976 television film, Helter Skelter, and further explore the case, the trial, the motive behind the murders, the connection to  Hollywood, and how history was changed forever. Registration is required by September 30.

+ One Day Tours/Excursions

Wednesday, October 9, 9 am-3 pm.
Depart from the Ozinga Chapel at 9am.
Jim Kwasteniet, history of Chicago educator

Join us as we walk the streets of downtown Chicago observing the  amazing architecture of the city and learning about the history of those magnificent buildings. See some of the very first “skyscrapers” of the late 19th century and many buildings that are on the National Registry of Historic Buildings. This is a walking tour covering approximately 2-3 miles. We will take frequent breaks. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and bring money for lunch. Transportation and our tour costs are covered in the $25 fee. Registration is required by September 20.

+ One Session Offerings

Thursday, October 24 from 3-4:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Jeff Hoelzel, attorney at law

Understanding how financial matters impact you from day-to-day can make a big difference in your life. The goal of Financial Literacy 101 is to enhance your understanding of financial concepts and
services so that you can make good and informed decisions with  your financial resources. We will learn about budgeting, saving, debt management and planning for retirement. Basic principles of investing will also be explained. The tools we explore will enable you to take control of your own financial education and prevent  inancial problems before they start. Registration is required by September 30.

Tuesday, October 22, 10-11:15 am.
Heritage Science Center, Room 200
Dr. Kyle Dieleman, professor of history

In light of Western society’s continued struggles with race, equality, and dehumanization of all sorts, Douglass’ account of his journey to freedom provides insights into the past that shine a light on the human situation. Join our group discussion of Douglass’  Narrative to better understand the struggles of American slaves in the nineteenth century and the brutality of slavery itself. We will also discuss how slavery was a dehumanizing institution for all  involved while also finding glimmers of hope and grace even in desperate situations. Registration is required by September 30.

Thursday, November 7, 2-3:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Dr. Ken Schoon, professor emeritus of science education

This fully-illustrated presentation will explore today’s Indiana Dunes. Discover the rugged beauty  of this remarkable landscape, their ecological importance, and the controversies, struggles, battles,  and scams that make up their unique history. Registration is required by September 30.

+ Three Session Offerings

Tuesdays, October 1, 8, 15, 4-5 pm.
Ozinga Chapel Grand Lobby
Dr. Mary Lynn Colosimo, professor emeritus of psychology

Join us as we explore the 7 attitudinal foundations of mindfulness practice including non-judging, patience, beginner’s mind, trust, non-striving, acceptance, and letting go. This course involves reading,
journal writing, exercises, yoga, music and discussion. Please bring a yoga mat and dress comfortably. All yoga will be gentle. Registration is required by September 20.

Thursdays, October 3, 10, 17, 2-3:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

Reading historical novels is a great way to learn history. But how do these novels shape our view of history and deal with societies that are deeply divided and that even confront revolution? In this class we will  examine three European countries in three different eras through historical novels. We will focus on late eighteenth-century Britain through Winston Graham’s Poldark series, nineteenth-century France through Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables, and early twentieth-century Russia through Mikhail Sholokhov’s And Quiet Flows the Don. You need not read any of these novels to participate in and enjoy the class. (I will suggest that you might like to watch the Poldark series through several seasons on PBS and, more recently, PBS’s presentation on Les Miserables.) Registration is required by September 20.

Mondays, October 7, 14, 21, 4-5:15 pm.
Classroom Building, Room 212
Christian Altena, history educator

The great moments and movements of American history have always had a soundtrack. Songs have helped motivate us in times of war, lift our spirits in times of crisis and spur us to action to fight injustice. Popular music gives us a unique window to the past, showing us the attitudes, arguments and passions of common people in uncommon circumstances. Over the course of the class we will listen and sing our way through
American history from the Colonial era to the present. Registration is required by September 20.

Tuesdays, October 8, 15, 22, 1-2:15 pm.
Vermeer Fireside Room, Administration Building
Emily Bosscher, Director of First Year Experience

George Orwell said, “Every generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.” Currently in the United States, there are 6 named  generations, and the generation currently in high school and college is the largest, most influential,
and perhaps most mystifying generation at this time. We will take an in-depth look at who and what this generation is, how they got this way, and how we can relate to and understand them best. This course is
especially pertinent, perhaps, for those with grandchildren between the ages of 10-24, but also relevant to anyone interested in social psychology, education, and culture! Registration is required by September 20.

Mondays, October 14, 21, 28, 2-3:15 pm.
Classroom Building, Room 211
Cleo Lampos, storyteller

This mini-series introduces three distinct groups of people from the 1930s who defied the desperation of  the time and created a legacy. The first groups, the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) and WPA (Works Progress Administration) in Illinois employed thousands of young men to build and reshape this great  state. Many of their projects are still in use. We will explore an eye-opening account of the art mural projects in Chicago that were saved by a special education teacher. A second group of legacy makers that  will be introduced are three athletes of the 1963 Berlin Olympics who demonstrated the relationship
between deprivation and success. Faith played an important component in these three individuals’ lives.  the third, and final, legacy makers we will explore are the Pack Horse Librarians who rode into the hollers of Kentucky to bring literacy to  isolated families. We will also highlight the bookmobiles utilized in this time frame. This mini-series brings honor to thousands of people who pressed through tough times with strong inner faith. Registration is required by September 20.

Wednesdays, October 16, 23, 30, 2-3:15 pm.
Classroom Building, Room 202
Dr. Dennis Connelly, professor of criminal justice

Fifty years later, come take an in-depth look into one of America’s most infamous crimes—the murders committed by the Charles Manson family. This class will view the original 1976 television film, Helter Skelter, and further explore the case, the trial, the motive behind the murders, the connection to  Hollywood, and how history was changed forever. Registration is required by September 30.

Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity

Andrea Dieleman

Director of Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity

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