The SALT
Program

Senior Learning Programs

Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity

SALT, or Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity, offers a wide variety of educational classes, local trips, book discussions, breakfast speakers, and travel (U.S. & overseas) for those in the community 55 and over. The mission of the SALT program is to stimulate learning and discussion that will enrich lives, foster relationships, and strengthen the varied communities in which we live.

Membership Perks Include

  • Limited access to Trinity’s fitness center
  • Free on-campus parking sticker
  • Discount to theater performances and special invitations to director discussions
  • Tour of Art and Communication Center prior to Artist Lectures in the Seerveld Gallery
  • Invitation to campus lectures and special discussions following the lectures
  • Invitation to music department recitals and concerts
  • Free admission to regular-season home athletic contests
  • Invitation to campus Chapel services
  • Free WiFi while on campus
  • Listener passes to traditional classes, beginning in the Spring semester

Costs

The annual individual membership fee is $35; membership is required before registering for any classes. (But registering for membership and classes may be done at the same time.)

One-session classes are $15 per course, two-session classes are $30 per course, and three-session classes are $40 per course.

Available Courses

Wednesday, October 25, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Bootsma Bookstore Café, Creekside Room
Corenna Roozeboom, garden educator

The Kitchen Community is a national organization that empowers kids to learn firsthand where real food comes from. With Learning Gardens in 153 Chicago Public Schools, a movement is growing to increase students’ access and preference for healthy, delicious food and to strengthen relationships while growing and eating it. Get a taste of the program as we harvest food from Trinity’s garden and prepare a simple recipe that CPS students are enjoying from their Learning Gardens.

Tuesdays, October 10 and 17, 2pm – 3:15pm
Vermeer Fireside Room
Dr. Ken Schoon, professor emeritus of science education

Calumet Beginnings and the Indiana Dunes is a two-week highly illustrated presentation about the unique geology, environment, and history of the area around the south shore of Lake Michigan.

Session one will discuss the creation of the Calumet area landscape, emphasizing the roles that glaciers, wind, and the waters of Lake Michigan played in forming the area and how the landscape affected the settlements that grew up in that area.

Session two will integrate dozens of colorful scenes of today’s Indiana Dunes, along with a description of their ecological importance and stories from yesteryear. Topics include fur trading and a Revolutionary War skirmish, hermits, developers and scams, railroads and Lincoln’s Duneland funeral, research and the birth of American ecology, efforts to save the Dunes amid efforts to industrialize, flying, fishing, residing, and restoration.

Wednesdays, October 11 and 18, 2pm – 3:15pm
Classroom 214
Dr. Bill Boerman-Cornell, professor of education

In session one Dr. Boerman-Cornell will explain the concept of a graphic novel. The top ten graphic novels will be reviewed and the stage will be set for session two, when we come prepared having read a graphic novel. In session two, the graphic novel, Bluffton, will be discussed. It’s a wonderful, nostalgic book set in Muskegon, Michigan where a circus comes for a month-long break. A circus kid and a local kid become friends and learn about each other’s worlds. There is a nice twist in the end. Check out the book at your local library and read it before the talk.

Wednesdays, October 25 and November 1, 2pm – 3:15pm
Vermeer Fireside Room
Roz DeBoer, fiber artist

Session one will include a discussion about Roz’s beginning work as a quilter and how on that path she developed her artistic gifts from traditional quilting to fiber art. In session two she will provide “Confessions of a material manipulator” and offer a window into her process and materials as she continues her artistic journey.

Mondays, October 23 and 30, 2pm – 3:15pm
Classroom 214
Dr. Aron Reppmann, professor of philosophy

On Oct. 31 we will celebrate the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s first public call to bring about reform in the Church. In this class we will focus on the work and vision of Martin Luther and John Calvin, which contributed to the Reformation. More than that, we will consider the spiritual longings of the sixteenth-century Church, important changes in European society, and the significant impact of the state in shaping the Reformation. The instructor will offer introductory perspectives, show video clips of the period, and seek comments and questions from the class.

Tuesdays, October 3, 10, and 24, 9am- 10:30am (there will be no class on Oct.17).
Palos Heights Recreation Department Gym
6601 W. 127th St.
Palos Heights, IL 60463
Jim Kwasteniet, physical education educator

Become a part of one of the fastest-growing and most popular games in the country. Pickle ball is a game suited for all ages and is a great form of exercise. This game combines the rules and skills of badminton, ping pong, and tennis and is played with a solid paddle and whiffle ball. The court is the size of a badminton court with the net lowered like a tennis net. The game is easy for beginners to learn. Come join us and get in on the fun and excitement. You may become hooked and discover a new and fun way to keep yourself active and healthy! Equipment will be provided.

Wednesdays, October 4, 11, and 18, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Classroom 215
Tom Panush, retired county sheriff

This class will cover all news fit to print, read, or discuss—local, national, and international. Tom’s classes are always buzzing with highspirited discussions. You are invited to join the lively intellectual debate or sit back and enjoy the goodhumored exchange. As a retired public servant, Tom has an insider’s view that is sure to broaden your horizons and your smile.

Tuesdays, October 10, 17, 24, 9am-10:15am
Van Namen Recital Hall (Chapel)
Cleo Lampos, storyteller

Session One: Hoovervilles, Hobos and Leo Hart

What happens when people lose their employment, then their homes? One quarter of the 1930’s population were homeless. At the migrant camp of Weedpatch, where John Steinbeck wrote Grapes of Wrath, children pulled back from attending the public school where the teachers shunned them. Leo Hart, an administrator, offered to take the Oakie children and teach them. The stories of the Hooverville residents, the rail-riding hobos, and a teacher who would not give up on his students are inspiring. Let a strong generation from the past encourage those of us in today’s challenges.

Session Two: The Soil Whisperers

Who hasn’t heard of the dog whisperer or the horse whisperer. But the soil whisperers? The Dust Bowl of the 1930s enveloped the midsection of the United States with devastation. This session will look at three men who brought green plants back to near-desert areas with a techniques that farmers still use today. With perseverance, Hugh Bennett and Henry Finnell taught beleaguered farmers how to grow crops again. On the southeast side of the country, George Washington Carver set out to heal the soil.

Session Three: Pack Horse Librarians and Bookmobiles: The Librarians Who Spread Literacy to Urban and Remote Areas

Under the auspices of the WPA (Work Project Authority), thousands of women worked to take books to underserved areas or to places where books were a rarity. The pack horse librarians forged streams and braved wild animals to take saddle bags of books, magazines, recipes, and quilt patterns to the hollers of Kentucky. Bookmobiles traveled to logging/mining camps, CCC camps, and the workers of the Tennessee Valley Authority to provide literacy. After hearing the stories, you will never view a librarian in the same light in place of before.

Mondays, Oct. 16, 23, 30 1pm – 2:15 pm
Classroom 201
Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

This course will examine America’s foreign policy during World War II, during the Cold War, and during the last 25 years of our history. While we will refer to American interests and our involvement in many situations across the world, we will emphasize the competing visions that shape our foreign policy. During the last session of the class, we will consider how the foreign policy of recent administrations has been affected by these competing visions.

On-campus session Tuesday, Oct. 24 from 1 pm – 2:15 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room;

Three-hour tour at Pullman on Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1pm – 4pm
Roger Wiers, political science educator

Many stories converge around the Pullman community. It is the story of entrepreneurship and the growth of the railroad industry. The town itself is a story of urban planning in response to the uncontrolled growth of cities. Labor history is part of the story of Chicago and Pullman. One the most important strikes in American history occurred here, as well as the development of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph. Through all these stories runs the stories of the people who live in Pullman.

The class will include two sessions. The first will be a classroom session on the historical background of Pullman. The second session will be a three-hour tour of Pullman. This tour will include visits to the Greenstone Church, the Hotel Florence, the factory site, two Pullman homes, a video presentation at the visitor’s center, and a walking tour of the community.

Thursdays, October 12, 19, 26, 2pm – 3:15 pm
Heritage Science Center Room 106
Dr. Lou Sytsma, professor emeritus of chemistry

Environmental degradations of air, water, and land will be investigated with a particular emphasis on global climate change. Stewardship principles from a Christian perspective will be looked at in order help us view these problems.

+ One Session Offerings

Wednesday, October 25, 3:30 – 4:45pm
Bootsma Bookstore Café, Creekside Room
Corenna Roozeboom, garden educator

The Kitchen Community is a national organization that empowers kids to learn firsthand where real food comes from. With Learning Gardens in 153 Chicago Public Schools, a movement is growing to increase students’ access and preference for healthy, delicious food and to strengthen relationships while growing and eating it. Get a taste of the program as we harvest food from Trinity’s garden and prepare a simple recipe that CPS students are enjoying from their Learning Gardens.

+ Two Session Offerings

Tuesdays, October 10 and 17, 2pm – 3:15pm
Vermeer Fireside Room
Dr. Ken Schoon, professor emeritus of science education

Calumet Beginnings and the Indiana Dunes is a two-week highly illustrated presentation about the unique geology, environment, and history of the area around the south shore of Lake Michigan.

Session one will discuss the creation of the Calumet area landscape, emphasizing the roles that glaciers, wind, and the waters of Lake Michigan played in forming the area and how the landscape affected the settlements that grew up in that area.

Session two will integrate dozens of colorful scenes of today’s Indiana Dunes, along with a description of their ecological importance and stories from yesteryear. Topics include fur trading and a Revolutionary War skirmish, hermits, developers and scams, railroads and Lincoln’s Duneland funeral, research and the birth of American ecology, efforts to save the Dunes amid efforts to industrialize, flying, fishing, residing, and restoration.

Wednesdays, October 11 and 18, 2pm – 3:15pm
Classroom 214
Dr. Bill Boerman-Cornell, professor of education

In session one Dr. Boerman-Cornell will explain the concept of a graphic novel. The top ten graphic novels will be reviewed and the stage will be set for session two, when we come prepared having read a graphic novel. In session two, the graphic novel, Bluffton, will be discussed. It’s a wonderful, nostalgic book set in Muskegon, Michigan where a circus comes for a month-long break. A circus kid and a local kid become friends and learn about each other’s worlds. There is a nice twist in the end. Check out the book at your local library and read it before the talk.

Wednesdays, October 25 and November 1, 2pm – 3:15pm
Vermeer Fireside Room
Roz DeBoer, fiber artist

Session one will include a discussion about Roz’s beginning work as a quilter and how on that path she developed her artistic gifts from traditional quilting to fiber art. In session two she will provide “Confessions of a material manipulator” and offer a window into her process and materials as she continues her artistic journey.

Mondays, October 23 and 30, 2pm – 3:15pm
Classroom 214
Dr. Aron Reppmann, professor of philosophy

On Oct. 31 we will celebrate the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s first public call to bring about reform in the Church. In this class we will focus on the work and vision of Martin Luther and John Calvin, which contributed to the Reformation. More than that, we will consider the spiritual longings of the sixteenth-century Church, important changes in European society, and the significant impact of the state in shaping the Reformation. The instructor will offer introductory perspectives, show video clips of the period, and seek comments and questions from the class.

+ Three Session Offerings

Tuesdays, October 3, 10, and 24, 9am- 10:30am (there will be no class on Oct.17).
Palos Heights Recreation Department Gym
6601 W. 127th St.
Palos Heights, IL 60463
Jim Kwasteniet, physical education educator

Become a part of one of the fastest-growing and most popular games in the country. Pickle ball is a game suited for all ages and is a great form of exercise. This game combines the rules and skills of badminton, ping pong, and tennis and is played with a solid paddle and whiffle ball. The court is the size of a badminton court with the net lowered like a tennis net. The game is easy for beginners to learn. Come join us and get in on the fun and excitement. You may become hooked and discover a new and fun way to keep yourself active and healthy! Equipment will be provided.

Wednesdays, October 4, 11, and 18, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Classroom 215
Tom Panush, retired county sheriff

This class will cover all news fit to print, read, or discuss—local, national, and international. Tom’s classes are always buzzing with highspirited discussions. You are invited to join the lively intellectual debate or sit back and enjoy the goodhumored exchange. As a retired public servant, Tom has an insider’s view that is sure to broaden your horizons and your smile.

Tuesdays, October 10, 17, 24, 9am-10:15am
Van Namen Recital Hall (Chapel)
Cleo Lampos, storyteller

Session One: Hoovervilles, Hobos and Leo Hart

What happens when people lose their employment, then their homes? One quarter of the 1930’s population were homeless. At the migrant camp of Weedpatch, where John Steinbeck wrote Grapes of Wrath, children pulled back from attending the public school where the teachers shunned them. Leo Hart, an administrator, offered to take the Oakie children and teach them. The stories of the Hooverville residents, the rail-riding hobos, and a teacher who would not give up on his students are inspiring. Let a strong generation from the past encourage those of us in today’s challenges.

Session Two: The Soil Whisperers

Who hasn’t heard of the dog whisperer or the horse whisperer. But the soil whisperers? The Dust Bowl of the 1930s enveloped the midsection of the United States with devastation. This session will look at three men who brought green plants back to near-desert areas with a techniques that farmers still use today. With perseverance, Hugh Bennett and Henry Finnell taught beleaguered farmers how to grow crops again. On the southeast side of the country, George Washington Carver set out to heal the soil.

Session Three: Pack Horse Librarians and Bookmobiles: The Librarians Who Spread Literacy to Urban and Remote Areas

Under the auspices of the WPA (Work Project Authority), thousands of women worked to take books to underserved areas or to places where books were a rarity. The pack horse librarians forged streams and braved wild animals to take saddle bags of books, magazines, recipes, and quilt patterns to the hollers of Kentucky. Bookmobiles traveled to logging/mining camps, CCC camps, and the workers of the Tennessee Valley Authority to provide literacy. After hearing the stories, you will never view a librarian in the same light in place of before.

Mondays, Oct. 16, 23, 30 1pm – 2:15 pm
Classroom 201
Dr. Bob Rice, professor emeritus of history

This course will examine America’s foreign policy during World War II, during the Cold War, and during the last 25 years of our history. While we will refer to American interests and our involvement in many situations across the world, we will emphasize the competing visions that shape our foreign policy. During the last session of the class, we will consider how the foreign policy of recent administrations has been affected by these competing visions.

On-campus session Tuesday, Oct. 24 from 1 pm – 2:15 pm
Vermeer Fireside Room;

Three-hour tour at Pullman on Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1pm – 4pm
Roger Wiers, political science educator

Many stories converge around the Pullman community. It is the story of entrepreneurship and the growth of the railroad industry. The town itself is a story of urban planning in response to the uncontrolled growth of cities. Labor history is part of the story of Chicago and Pullman. One the most important strikes in American history occurred here, as well as the development of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph. Through all these stories runs the stories of the people who live in Pullman.

The class will include two sessions. The first will be a classroom session on the historical background of Pullman. The second session will be a three-hour tour of Pullman. This tour will include visits to the Greenstone Church, the Hotel Florence, the factory site, two Pullman homes, a video presentation at the visitor’s center, and a walking tour of the community.

Thursdays, October 12, 19, 26, 2pm – 3:15 pm
Heritage Science Center Room 106
Dr. Lou Sytsma, professor emeritus of chemistry

Environmental degradations of air, water, and land will be investigated with a particular emphasis on global climate change. Stewardship principles from a Christian perspective will be looked at in order help us view these problems.

Seasoned Adults

Ginny Carpenter

Director of Seasoned Adults Learning at Trinity