Michael Dieter

Assistant Professor of Education

Education

Ed.D., Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, 2021
M.A., Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, 2015
B.A., Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, 2008

Associated Academic Programs

Education

“As educators we are creators. This is not creating in the sense of a building, car or dish, but in creating the experiences and processes that can lead to a more equitable world through showing our students the ways in which they have can have a positive impact on the world around them, with the goal of them creating those experiences for their own students in the future.”

Dr. Michael Dieter says that there are two things he wants his students to take away from his education classes. “One is that education is a team sport. This is to say that the process of providing a quality education requires participation from many stakeholders including parents, teachers, school support personnel, and most importantly the students themselves,” he says. It’s important to remember that even though teachers may be in the classroom by themselves with their students, they still function as part of a team.

The second ties into his favorite scripture passage, from Proverbs 27:17 [NRSV]: “Iron sharpens iron, and one person sharpens the wits of another.”

“I want my students to remember that on a daily basis we all have the ability to help those around us grow and accomplish their goals, while at the same time we are sharpened on our journeys as well,” says Dieter.

Regarding education, he reflects upon what the theologian Richard Shaull has written: “Education either functions as an instrument that is used to facilitate the integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity to it, or it becomes ‘the practice of freedom,’ the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world.”

What drew him to Trinity:

Dieter was drawn to Trinity by its close-knit, interdisciplinary community that is committed to providing students with real-world learning opportunities to develop the skills that will allow them to make positive changes in their communities. “By having the chance to integrate theory and practice so frequently in their time with us, Trinity students are well positioned for success long after graduation.”

Research interests:

His research focuses on the ways in which discourse surrounding youth has an impact on the education they receive. “In our current moment, I’m very interested in the language surrounding learning-loss from the COVID-19 pandemic and how that will translate to daily instructional practices and the ways in which students are viewed by their teachers and administrators,” he says. “In my work, I seek to call attention to deficit thinking surrounding students and the ways in which teachers can resist this to elevate student voice and agency in their classrooms.”

When he’s not teaching:

“When I’m not teaching I’m usually traveling, hiking or completing a DIY project around the house,” he says.

Dieter, M., & Haepp, T. (2019). Maybe They Are Just Kinesthetic Learners? Student Walkouts and the Purposes of Education. Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis, 8 (1). 67-76.

+ Expertise

Dr. Michael Dieter says that there are two things he wants his students to take away from his education classes. “One is that education is a team sport. This is to say that the process of providing a quality education requires participation from many stakeholders including parents, teachers, school support personnel, and most importantly the students themselves,” he says. It’s important to remember that even though teachers may be in the classroom by themselves with their students, they still function as part of a team.

The second ties into his favorite scripture passage, from Proverbs 27:17 [NRSV]: “Iron sharpens iron, and one person sharpens the wits of another.”

“I want my students to remember that on a daily basis we all have the ability to help those around us grow and accomplish their goals, while at the same time we are sharpened on our journeys as well,” says Dieter.

Regarding education, he reflects upon what the theologian Richard Shaull has written: “Education either functions as an instrument that is used to facilitate the integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity to it, or it becomes ‘the practice of freedom,’ the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world.”

What drew him to Trinity:

Dieter was drawn to Trinity by its close-knit, interdisciplinary community that is committed to providing students with real-world learning opportunities to develop the skills that will allow them to make positive changes in their communities. “By having the chance to integrate theory and practice so frequently in their time with us, Trinity students are well positioned for success long after graduation.”

Research interests:

His research focuses on the ways in which discourse surrounding youth has an impact on the education they receive. “In our current moment, I’m very interested in the language surrounding learning-loss from the COVID-19 pandemic and how that will translate to daily instructional practices and the ways in which students are viewed by their teachers and administrators,” he says. “In my work, I seek to call attention to deficit thinking surrounding students and the ways in which teachers can resist this to elevate student voice and agency in their classrooms.”

When he’s not teaching:

“When I’m not teaching I’m usually traveling, hiking or completing a DIY project around the house,” he says.

+ Courses, Publications & Research

Dieter, M., & Haepp, T. (2019). Maybe They Are Just Kinesthetic Learners? Student Walkouts and the Purposes of Education. Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis, 8 (1). 67-76.